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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
wants to avoid with this fiscal cliff conversation. that's why a deal is going to be hammered out probably before the end of the year. the president does have a little political head wind. >> this gives, i think, labor a real opportunity to show the country the graph that we showed, the separation between corporate profits are right there at a record level and wages are going down. the republicans have been so strong to even want to take away workers voices in the workplace. but in these fiscal cliff negotiations, do you really think that the republicans see this chart and they need that economy to slow down a little bit if they are going to win this? >> maybe so. the income inequality in this country has been a problem but it has been for decades. it's been exacerbated by policies passed more recently. so when you go into negotiations, you ask, is it politically correct to be out there arguing that the 2% need to have their tax cuts protected? that's the problem that republicans face. labor does have a bit of an upper hand on this one. but then again, you look at all the stuff be
that republicans have to deal with as they think about the politics and the optics of how the fiscal cliff gets resolved. in the end, they have got not much. they can say they have a mandate so it's equal, but it really isn't and they know that. >> we seem to know as much about mitt romney's taxes as we do about the loopholes republicans are willing to close in this. they can't offer any specifics. is this a turnoff for the people? >> in fairness we have to recognize that there's been a lack of specifics on both sides here. they are negotiating in public. you notice that that's how this stuff is coming out. it's not phone calls between the two sides or closed-door meetings. we don't know what spending democrats would cut and we haven't even begun the entitlements discussion, which the president is theoretically open to. so there's a lot that still needs to happen. i mean for you and me and normal people, three weeks away may seem like a short time, but there's a feeling that this has barely even begun. >> here's senator bob corker and claire mccaskill. here it is. >> i have just laid out in ver
at this with a great deal of optimism. >> i think we're going over the fiscal cliff. it's pretty clear that they have made this happen. they are not saving social security and medicare and medicaid from imminent bankruptcy. jenna: james is live in washington with more. reporter: yes, what is clear is increasingly, the two sides -- the obama, white house, senate democrats on one side, senate republicans on the other, there is a ticking clock involved here. they should be hitting their stride right about now. timothy geithner is trying to avoid plunging of the fiscal cliff. he has made clear that the obama administration is saying that the first order of business has to be to extend tax breaks for middle-class families and raise tax rates for the top 2% of income earners. talks over how to rein in entitlement spending should be held sometime next year. >> the president is asking for $1.6 trillion of new revenue over 10 years. twice as much as he has been asking for the public. his stimulus spending exceeded the amount of new cuts that he was willing to consider. it was not a serious offer. reporter: en
are nowhere close to a deal to avert that fiscal cliff. the obama administration has laid out its plan calling for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. that includes letting the bush era tax cuts expire for those earning more than $250,000 a year. it's also pushing for a new $50 billion stimulus package and offering $400 billion in new cuts to medicare and other entitlement programs. but republican house speaker john boehner flatly rejected the plan on the table and what he calls the white house's unwillingness to compromise. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him, i said, you can't be serious. i've never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> you know, i think right now the best thing to do is for them to come to us and say, look, here's what we think makes sense. we've told them what we think makes sense. what we can't do is try to figure out what's going to be good for them. they have to come tell us. >> house minority leader and democrat nancy pelosi also jumping into
. >> there is a plan on the table. it is the fiscal cliff. we will have very large tax increases for everybody. the president has proposed something that would force all of that. can the republicans offer publicly an alternative, either to the fiscal cliff or to what the president is offering. the president's plan was put on the table last week. it was not that well with president on. speaker boehner and others. stuart: i wonder, as an insider, among democrats, and that is what you are, simon, i want you to tell me, what plans does the president or any other democrats, have to reform social entitlement? >> first of all, if you remember well, stuart, mitt romney and the republicans beat up on president obama for the last three years for cutting medicare at $716 billion. he has already showed he is willing to take a big bite out of a major entitlement program. stuart: hold on a second. i do remember it. that is not reform. that is not reforming the structure of entitlement programs. that is the issue. >> i think the focus has been on medicare. the attention now needs to be on medicare inside the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)